CLL Coverage from Every Angle
Advertisement
Advertisement

Can Baseline Geriatric Domains Help to Identify High-Risk Patients With CLL?

By: Julia Fiederlein
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2021

According to Patrick Connor Johnson, MD, of Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues, the baseline geriatric domains of functional status, social activity, and nutritional status seem to be associated with overall and progression-free survival in older adults with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The findings of this secondary data analysis, which were presented during the 2021 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting (Abstract 12041), highlight the importance of assessing geriatric domains to identify high-risk patients.

“CLL is a disease that commonly affects older adults,” the investigators remarked. “Although the value of geriatric assessment is increasingly being recognized in older adults with cancer, few studies have examined the relationship between baseline geriatric domains and clinical outcomes in older adults with CLL.”

The investigators focused on 369 patients, with a median age of 71 years, who were treated with bendamustine plus rituximab, ibrutinib plus rituximab, or ibrutinib alone in a phase III randomized trial. Based on the multivariable analyses, better functional status (activities of daily living score: P = .012; instrumental activities of daily living score: P = .007), social activity score (P = .004), and nutritional status (P = .008) seemed to be significantly associated with overall survival. Additionally, functional status (activities of daily living score: P = .028; instrumental activities of daily living score: P = .007), social activity score (P < .001), and nutritional status (P < .001) were reported to be associated with progression-free survival. The investigators noted that the number of impaired geriatric domains seemed to be associated with overall (P = .004) and progression-free (P < .001) survival. Timed “Up and Go,” the number of falls in the past 6 months, psychological status, cognition, and social support were not found to be significantly associated with clinical outcomes.

Disclosure: The study authors reported no conflicts of interest.



By continuing to browse this site you permit us and our partners to place identification cookies on your browser and agree to our use of cookies to identify you for marketing. Read our Privacy Policy to learn more.