Ovarian Cancer Coverage from Every Angle
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Video-Assisted Genetic Counseling for Patients With Ovarian Cancer

By: Lauren Harrison, MS
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Patients with ovarian, fallopian, or peritoneal cancer who watched a genetic counseling video prior to formal genetic counseling were more likely to undergo genetic testing compared with those who received standard counseling methods. Patrick Blackburn, MD, of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, and colleagues made their findings available as a part of the virtual platform for the 2020 Society of Gynecological Oncology (SGO) Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer (Abstract 16).

A total of 80 patients who had undergone surgical staging and received at least two cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy were eligible for this study. The median age of patients in this study was 67 years, and most patients had stage IIIC disease. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either video-assisted counseling followed by an option to undergo immediate genetic testing or formal genetic counseling. Patients in the formal genetic counseling group watched a video-assisted introduction to counseling, followed by referral to formal genetic consultation. A three-part questionnaire was administered to inquire about knowledge revisions, perceived personal control, and the impact of events-intrusion before and after the interventions.

More patients in the group who viewed video-assisted genetic counseling chose to proceed with genetic testing than did those in the formal consultation group (95% vs. 75%, respectively). Two patients in the formal counseling group did not want to undergo testing after receiving genetic counseling, and three did not undergo formal consultation at all.

Patients in both arms of this study showed significant improvements in their knowledge scores as well as perceived personal control when comparing their surveys before and after the educational intervention. The changes in these scores did not significantly differ between the groups.

Disclosure: The study authors’ disclosure information can be found at sgo.confex.com.



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