Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Coverage from Every Angle
Advertisement
Advertisement

Long-Term Data Support Ibrutinib Monotherapy in Patients With CLL/SLL

By: Celeste L. Dixon
Posted: Monday, May 18, 2020

In the longest extended follow-up to date—up to 8 years—of any study examining the single-agent use of a Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor, researchers demonstrated the overall safety and efficacy of ibrutinib in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). John C. Byrd, MD, of The Ohio State Medical School in Columbus, and colleagues published the results of their pivotal phase Ib/II and extension studies in Clinical Cancer Research. In the 132 patients ultimately treated with the once-daily agent, the estimated 7-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 84% and 83% in the first-line setting and 55% and 34% in the relapsed or refractory setting, respectively.

The median age of the 31 patients treated with first-line ibrutinib was 71 years, and it was 64 years for the 101 patients with relapsed or refractory disease; the latter group also had a median of four prior therapies. The overall response rate was 89% across the entire cohort.

“In relapsed/refractory CLL/SLL, median progression-free survival was 52 months overall,” stated Dr. Byrd and co-investigators. It was “26 months in patients with chromosome 17p deletion, 51 months [in those] with 11q deletion, not reached [in those] with trisomy 12 or 13q deletion, and 88 months in patients without these cytogenetic abnormalities.” The median progression-free survival was not reached with first-line ibrutinib.

A total of 41 patients experienced CLL progression, 11 with Richter’s transformation, the team pointed out. They also noted that the grade ≥ 3 adverse events occurring in more than 15% of patients were hypertension (28%), pneumonia (24%), and neutropenia (18%). However, pneumonia and neutropenia generally declined over time.

Disclosure: The study authors’ disclosure information can be found at aacrjournals.org.



By continuing to browse this site you permit us and our partners to place identification cookies on your browser and agree to our use of cookies to identify you for marketing. Read our Privacy Policy to learn more.