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Primary Tumor Size and Survival After Surgery in Kidney Cancer

By: Vanessa A. Carter, BS
Posted: Tuesday, July 6, 2021

Jianhui Ma, MD, of the National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, and colleagues investigated the relationship between prognosis and primary tumor size in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who underwent cytoreductive nephrectomy. Published in Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment, these results suggested that small tumor size may, in fact, be an independent factor of prognosis.

A total of 96 patients from a Chinese center and 4,403 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database were retrospectively reviewed for analysis. Small tumors were defined as being less than 4 cm, and cytoreductive nephrectomy was defined as any nephrectomy performed on patients diagnosed with metastasis.

In the Chinese cohort, the median follow-up was 73 months, and the median primary tumor size was 7 cm. Notably, individuals with small tumors (n = 13) were found to be less likely to have tumors of stage and grade 3 or 4, and stage 1 lymph node metastasis, compared with those who had large tumors (n = 83). The 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 57.3% and 14.9%, respectively, with patients who had small tumors experiencing a longer overall survival (30 months) than those with large tumors (24 months).

However, in the SEER cohort, the median follow-up was 75 months, and the median primary tumor size was 9 cm. When compared with patients who had large tumors (n = 4,060), individuals with small tumors (n = 343) in this cohort were also reported to be less likely to have tumors of stage and grade 3 or 4, and stage 1 lymph node metastasis. The 2-year overall survival rate was 50.4%, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 25.3%, with patients who had small tumors achieving a longer overall survival (43 months) than those with large tumors (23 months).

Disclosure: The study authors reported no conflicts of interest.



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