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Do Associated Comorbidities Affect Oxidative Stress in CML?

By: Kayci Reyer
Posted: Tuesday, September 15, 2020

According to research published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the presence of oxidative stress may have a meaningful impact on the prognosis of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who receive tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Emilia Georgiana Pascu Vînturis, MD, and Amelia Maria Găman, MD, PhD, of the University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania, observed that oxidative stress levels varied depending on the specific therapy administered and/or the specific comorbidity present.

The study included 95 participants: 75 been diagnosed with CML and were receiving first- or second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment and 20 acted as a control. In the patient group, 53.3% (n = 40) had associated comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension, and heart failure (subgroup 1), whereas 46.7% (n = 35) had no associated comorbidities (subgroup 2).

Overall, reactive oxygen species and antioxidant capacity values tended to be higher for the patient group than for the control group. In subgroup 1, reactive oxidative stress values were lower, and antioxidant capacity values were higher than in subgroup 2. Reactive oxidative stress values were higher for patients in subgroup 1 with diabetes mellitus or heart failure than for the control group but were lower for those with dyslipidemia than for the control group. A possible reason for this, according to the authors, might be due to medication interactions between tyrosine kinase inhibitors and comorbidity-specific therapies.

Baseline hematologic data were gathered using a complete hemoleucogram, hematogenous bone marrow aspirate, cytogenetic examination, and BCR-ABL transcript. Plasmatic antioxidant capacity determination and quantitative measurement of cellular reactive oxygen species were also performed.

Disclosure: The study authors reported no conflicts of interest.



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