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Novel Approach to Detecting PD-L1 in the Urine of Patients With Bladder Cancer

By: Joseph Fanelli
Posted: Friday, August 27, 2021

According to findings presented in a proof-of-concept study in Scientific Reports, it may be possible to identify PD-L1 in the urine of patients with non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancers. Stefan Duensing, MD, of the University of Heidelberg, Germany, and colleagues reported that their study was reportedly the first to use an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay–based method to find PD-L1 in the urine of patients with bladder cancer.

“Further prospective and independent evaluations, in particular longitudinal studies, are required to assess urinary PD-L1 as a biomarker for the monitoring and detection of bladder cancer, building upon the initial evidence we present here,” the authors concluded.

In this study, the authors collected 122 urine samples from patients at the Department of Urology of the University Hospital Heidelberg. Individual samples belong to three groups: patients with newly diagnosed urothelial cancer of the bladder who had not undergone transurethral resection of the bladder (20 patients); patients with recurrent urothelial cancer of the bladder who were previously treated with transurethral resection of the bladder (63 patients); and a control group of patients who were diagnosed with non-neoplastic diseases (39 patients).

The authors observed that median urine levels of PD-L1 were elevated in both patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent bladder cancers. Those with newly diagnosed non-muscle invasive bladder cancer had PD-L1 levels of 11.28 pg/mL, compared with 71.73 pg/mL in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. In patients with recurrent disease, PD-L1 levels were 7.9 and 4.1 pg/mL in non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancers, respectively. The median PD-L1 level in the control group was 0 pg/mL.

For those patients who had undergone transurethral resection of the bladder, a direct comparison of the PD-L1 urine levels among those with a documented negative cystoscopy and the remaining individuals showed no statistically significant difference.

Disclosure: The authors reported no conflicts of interest.



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