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Prognostic Ability of Long Noncoding RNAs in Patients With Cytogenetically Normal AML

By: Joseph Fanelli
Posted: Wednesday, October 27, 2021

The recurrent genetic variants of long noncoding RNAs expressed in the leukemic blasts of patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may have prognostic value and potential biologic significance, according to findings presented in the journal Haematologica. Specific variants were associated with longer overall survival and better patient outcomes, concluded Ramiro Garzon, MD, of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at The Ohio State University, and colleagues.

“We believe that our work will serve as a useful starting point for further studies on the role of genetic variants in the noncoding transcriptome of cancer patients,” the authors said.

In this study, the authors analyzed total RNA-sequencing data from 377 adults up to age 60 who were diagnosed with cytogenetically normal AML. Available genomic databases and stringent filters were used to annotate genetic variants unequivocally located in the noncoding transcriptome of these patients.

The authors found 891 variants recurrently present in long noncoding RNAs that were expressed in leukemic blasts. Among those variants, two were associated with longer survival for patients with cytogenetically normal AML: RP5-1074L1.4 and SNHG15. The presence of the SNHG15 cytosine-to-thymidine variant also tended to be associated with better patient outcomes in an independent data set of patients with cytogenetically normal AML, despite differences in treatment protocols and RNA-sequencing techniques.

Additionally, the authors cloned and overexpressed both wild-type and variant versions of the SNHG15 long noncoding RNA. They found that overexpression of the wild-type SNHG15 variant also seemed to be associated with a higher proliferation rate of leukemic blasts when compared with the cytosine-to-thymidine variant.

Disclosure: For full disclosures of the study authors, visit haematologica.org.



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