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Treatment Outcomes Based on Ethnicity in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

By: Meg Barbor, MPH
Posted: Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Compared with Caucasian patients, Hispanic patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have a statistically shorter time to treatment failure and survival, according to research published by Dominick Bosse, MD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Discrepancies in clinical cancer outcomes between different ethnic groups are generally well known, they added, but in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma receiving vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) targeted therapy, the differences are less clear.

In the study, Caucasians, African Americans, and Hispanics with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who had been treated with first-line VEGF targeted therapy were identified from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium. The investigators created two matched cohorts: one with African Americans versus Caucasians and the other with Hispanics versus Caucasians. A total of 73 African Americans and 71 Hispanics were matched with 1,236 and 901 eligible Caucasians, respectively.

In comparison with Caucasians, Hispanics were found to have a statistically shorter time to treatment failure (5.4 vs. 7.6 months), as well as a statistically shorter overall survival (17.5 vs. 25.9 months). African Americans exhibited a trend toward a shorter time to treatment failure in comparison with Caucasians but similar survival.

“Underlying genetic/biological differences, along with potential cultural variations, may impact survival in Hispanic metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients,” the investigators concluded.