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EHA25 Virtual: FLT3 Inhibitor Plus Chemotherapy for Younger Patients With AML

By: Sarah Campen, PharmD
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2020

Treatment with the FLT3 inhibitor crenolanib plus chemotherapy in younger patients with newly diagnosed FTL3-mutant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) demonstrated anticancer activity, according to the results of a study presented during the virtual edition of the 25th European Hematology Association Annual Congress (EHA25 Virtual; Abstract EP541). “We observed similar overall survival in patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant [HSCT] as compared to those who did not after achieving complete remission,” stated Aaron D. Goldberg, MD, PhD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, and colleagues.

In this phase II trial, 27 patients between the ages of 18 and 60 with newly diagnosed FLT3-mutant AML received 7+3 induction therapy—cytarabine for 7 days and either daunorubicin (n = 16) or idarubicin (n = 11) for 3 days. Started 24 to 48 hours after induction therapy, crenolanib was given at 100 mg three times daily until 72 hours prior to the next chemotherapy cycle. Next, consolidation consisted of up to four cycles of high-dose cytarabine, with crenolanib started 24 hours after the final dose of high-dose cytarabine in each cycle. Eligible patients proceeded to allogeneic HSCT, and maintenance crenolanib was initiated at 100 mg three times daily after high-dose cytarabine or 30 to 90 days after HSCT, for up to 12 cycles.

Complete remission was achieved by 23 patients (85%) after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy; of those with complete remission, 7 received high-dose cytarabine in lieu of HSCT. All three patients who relapsed did so within the first year of treatment, and no relapses were reported in patients who completed at least one cycle of crenolanib maintenance. After a median follow-up of 43.2 months, 21 patients (76.8%) remain alive.

Disclosures: For full disclosures of the study authors, visit library.ehaweb.org.



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