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Long-Term Outcomes for Children With AML: Vietnamese Retrospective Study

By: Joseph Fanelli
Posted: Wednesday, June 24, 2020

According to the results of a 10-year retrospective cohort study evaluating the outcomes of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated at a hospital in Vietnam, complete remission rates increased with standard treatment, but overall survival rates were still low compared with those in developed countries. These findings presented in Pediatric Reports by Tran Kiem Hao, MD, PhD, of Hue Central Hospital, Vietnam, and colleagues reflect the difficulty in treating patients with AML in low- and middle-income countries.

“We are considering the way to improve the quality of treatment for childhood AML,” the authors noted. They plan to focus on supportive care to reduce infection, a standard protocol for febrile neutropenia, and timely administration of chemotherapy.

The study included 98 children with AML—with a mean age of 5.6 years—admitted to Hue Central Hospital from 2010 to 2019. Patients were treated using a modified AML 7 + 3 regimen. After induction therapy, the overall complete remission rate was 82.6%. At 3 years, overall survival was 23.2%, and event-free survival was 20.2%. The authors noted these figures were lower than those in developed countries such as Japan (75%) and the United States (64%), as well as in China (7-year overall survival of 33%) and Thailand (5-year overall survival of 35%).

Treatment abandonment was reduced to 4.1% because of a host of holistic strategies, the authors noted, including financial support, managing family groups, providing education about treatment, early follow-up of patients who missed appointments, and free accommodations near the hospital for patients and families.

Disclosure: The authors reported no conflicts of interest.



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